What is Dyslexia?

Certified Dyslexia Tutor Specializing in the O.G. based Barton Reading and Spelling System

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What is Dyslexia?

Simply stated:


Dyslexia is an inherited condition that makes it extremely difficult to read, write, and spell in your native language – despite at least average intelligence.


The definition the International Dyslexia Association gives is:


“Dyslexia is a neurologically-based, often familial, disorder which interferes 

with the acquisition and processing of language. Varying in degrees of 

severity, it is manifested by difficulties in receptive and expressive 

language, including phonological processing, in reading, writing, spelling, 

handwriting, and sometimes in arithmetic.Dyslexia is not the result of 

lack of motivation, sensory impairment, inadequate instructional 

or environmental opportunities, or other limiting conditions, but 

may occur together with these conditions.Although dyslexia is lifelong, 

individuals with dyslexia frequently respond successfully to timely and 

appropriate intervention.”


        Dyslexia is a brain difference. The wiring of the brain is different. Neurons are found in unusual places in the brain, they are not as neat and orderly as a non-dyslexic brain. The right hemisphere is also different. It is larger than non-dyslexic’s. (That is right, dyslexics have a larger brain!) This is why many people with dyslexia exhibit strengths in the areas of artistic and/or music talent, athletic and/or mechanical ability, 3-D visualization, intuitiveness, and are creative with problem solving. All of these abilities are from the right brain.


      

                                              

                                                        Dyslexic Brain                     Unimpaired Brain

                                                        While Reading                        While Reading


Studies using f/MRI have shown that people with dyslexia do not use the same part of their brain when reading as other people. Regular readers consistently use the same part of their brain when they read. People with dyslexia do not use this part and there appears to be no consistent part used among dyslexic readers. F/MRI scans have also proved that with remediation, a dyslexic’s brain can fix their wiring. And once the brain has re-wired itself, it stays that way.



                                                 

                                                          Dyslexic Brain                       Dyslexic Brain

                                                          While Reading                       While Reading

                                                    Before Remediation              After Remediation